06/16/2016 08:18:28
Kathy Svitil
Gerald Wasserburg, John D. MacArthur Professor of Geology and Geophysics, Emeritus, passed away on June 13, 2016. He was 89 years old.
06/13/2016 12:02:09
Robert Perkins
Experiment demonstrates that rare, naturally occurring quasicrystals could have been formed by high-speed impacts in space.
Diffraction pattern
04/18/2016 08:32:11
Kimm Fesenmaier
We recently sat down with Caltech's Paul Wennberg to talk about methane emissions and how to put the Aliso Canyon event into perspective.
02/03/2016 12:31:06
Katie Neith
On February 2, 2016, the White House held the Earthquake Resilience Summit, signaling a new focus on earthquake safety and EEW systems.
12/11/2015 16:47:34
Katie Neith
A team led by Caltech's Jennifer Jackson, professor of mineral physics has new evidence for the origin of features that occur at the core-mantle boundary.
10/27/2015 10:00:31
Rod Pyle
Using data from the W. M. Keck Observatory's OSIRIS spectrometer and maps from NASA's Galileo probe, researchers have mapped what may be salt deposits from the ocean below the ice onto the Jovian moon's surface.
Europa, as imaged by NASA's Galileo spacecraft.
10/13/2015 15:48:36
Lori Dajose
A team of Caltech researchers has measured the body temperatures of a wide range of dinosaurs, providing insight into how the animals may have regulated their internal heat.
09/21/2015 10:40:13
Douglas Smith
Caltech geochemist Clair Patterson (1922–1995) helped galvanize the environmental movement 50 years ago when he announced that highly toxic lead could be found essentially everywhere on Earth, including in our own bodies—and that very little of it was due to natural causes.
Clair Patterson and distillation apparatus.
08/06/2015 11:01:43
Kimm Fesenmaier
A team of scientists led by Caltech has pieced together the first complete account of what physically happened during the Gorkha earthquake—a picture that explains how the large temblor left the majority of low-story buildings in Kathmandu unscathed.
05/26/2015 16:34:15
Kimm Fesenmaier
Taking advantage of airborne radar tools, Caltech researchers provide two possible explanations for a series of unusual earthquakes seen in Iceland during a period of volcanic activity that started in August last year.
11/20/2014 11:01:20
Kimm Fesenmaier
A team of researchers has discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet. The geologists say that the ancient canyon—thousands of feet deep in places—effectively rules out a popular model used to explain how the massive and picturesque gorges of the Himalayas became so steep, so fast.
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